Desirable Impact Zone, the Full Review of the Swing Caddy by Swing Impact

The Swing Caddy is custom made for any number of drills and exercises. It is also a great equipment to stretch before the first swing at a driving range or on the course.

Swing Caddy Swing Trainer Recommendation

The highly recommended Swing Caddy golf training aid comes with an all-star line up of endorsements from professionals around the globe who specialize in teaching golfers how to get the most out of their golf swing.

Sure, there’s the Tiger Woods, Jordan Spieth, Dustin Johnson-type endorsements, but the Swing Caddy is backed not only by some big name touring pros, but by some of the best known teachers of the game in the country, including Peter Croker, who was named the PGA of Australia’s Best Teacher of the Year in 2007 and still makes a splash in his Youtube series and Canada’s Shawn Clement, ranked as the No. 1 Golf Coach on Youtube.

For those who make a living playing the game, endorsements have come from Mary Mills and Terry-Jo Myers, who together have won 12 LPGA Tour events. Mills, of course, has won the US LPGA Open and the LPGA Tour Championships on two occasions. She calls this deceptively simply device useful for both medium handicap golfers right on through to tour pros.

Also, Brian A. Crowell of the PGA is enthusiastically on board. And there are plenty of reasons why.

A Closer Look

First a look at what the Swing Caddy is all about. Picture a very short iron golf club with a flexible shaft – not quite as bendable as a fishing pole, but certainly with some wiggle in it. Maybe as bendable as a flag stick at your local golf course – but shorter than a pitching wedge.

The Swing Caddy also comes in two other variations – the shorter but just as powerful Hole In One, and the newest addition with a higher swing speed gauge, the Swing Caddy PRO.

Let’s take a look at the different measurements and dimensions of all three of these Swing Impact trainers:

Swing Caddy PRO

  • Swing Speed: 11 to 135 MPH
  • Yardage: 25 – 330 Yards
  • Length: 36″

Swing Caddy

  • Swing Speed: 11 to 110 MPH
  • Yardage: 25 – 280 Yards
  • Length: 36″

Hole In One

  • Swing Speed: 11 to 110 MPH
  • Yardage: 25 – 280 Yards
  • Length: 28″

Swing Caddy Golf Swing Trainers by Swing Impact

The Swing Caddy Technology

One end, a grip, like any other golf club. On the other end, instead of a golf head or blade, there’s a steel cylinder, known as the Control Scale, with calibrations that allow you to set the Swing Caddy to anticipate the club’s head speed. This is the patented technology that makes this swing trainer completely different from the rest.

Not only is the feel of the grip identical to any club, but the carefully measured weight of the Control Scale adds some weight to give the swing trainer and natural feel of a club.

Swing Impact Golf Swing Training Aids - Swing Caddy and Hole in One

Now inside that scale is their patented “Sinker Spring Loaded Magnet” technology that creates a dual-click system which provides instant feedback at the point of impact and at a proper follow-through.

By adjusting the Control Scale, the magnet ONLY clicks when it reaches the proper club head speed, and it automatically resets with complete follow-through.

You can set the Control Scale at 17 mph, about the speed of a 40 yards approach shot, and the Swing Caddy will come up with an audible click once it reaches 17 mph. You won’t get the click if you swing out of alignment or if the speed is too slow.

Swing Impact Golf Swing Training Aids - Swing Caddy and Hole in One

The key is to have the first click at the bottom of your swing, at the point of impact which should be just before your front foot. If that first click is happening before or after that position, it means you’re reaching the proper club head speed for your desired yardage too early or too late.

Why is this important?

If the optimal swing speed (the first click) for your desired yardage is happening before or after the proper point of impact, it means your ball will either be too short or too long.

If you want to shift gears and practice the big swing you deploy on a tee box, all you have to do is re-calibrate the Control Scale to another speed. The top speed for the Swing Caddy is 110 mph (about 280 yards), which allows you to practice that big, showy swing that gets you down the fairway.

With the new Swing Caddy PRO that number jumps up to 135 mpg (about 330 yards).

If you don’t hear the click at the bottom of the swing, just as the device points to the inside of your left foot (for right-handed golfers) then you need to adjust your swing accordingly.

Swing Caddy calls a click at the optimum time hitting the ball in the “desirable impact zone.”

This helps with timing, power, balance and swing, said golf coach Peter Croker. Furthermore, he says, it’s a great aid for practicing the A to B Drill.

How Does it Work?

The Swing Caddy is custom made for any number of drills and exercises. It is also a great equipment to stretch before the first swing at a driving range or on the course. How does it work? The answer is magnets.

Without a degree in physics, let’s just say somewhere in the sealed cylinder are magnets that shift when the speed & time is right, clicking audibly as they do. When the swing is over, the magnets reset the device back to the starting position, so you can swing, swing, swing and get click, click, click, one after another. You don’t have to reset anything after every swing.

Using the Swing Caddy is great for warming up for the tee box or calibrating your swing for the next 60 yard wedge shot. It is a a easy to understand the tempo of your swing for the various clubs in your bag. Just make sure the first ‘click’ is happening right before the point of impact and that second ‘click’ when you finish your follow through.

“Hear that gorgeous click?” says Shawn Clement on a Youtube presentation. And how does he describe the device? In one word: “Brilliant,” he says.

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